Frame Data Tutorial

Understanding frame data is essential if you are looking to take fighting games seriously. If you are completely new to fighting games then seeing these numbers might be confusing. This guide will explain frame data and how it works in Mortal Kombat 11.

First let’s try to understand what a frame is. Mortal Kombat 11 plays at 60 fps (frames per second). This means that after every second, 60 frames will have passed by. One frame is the equivalent to 1/60th of a second. We can use this to determine how fast certain moves are in the game.

Start-up

Start-up frames are the amount of frames a move takes before becoming active.

In this example, we’ll be looking at Jade. If we look at the start-up of Jade’s B2, we see that it has a start-up of 10 frames. A move with 10 frames of start-up or less is very fast as it comes out in 1/6th of a second. The lower the start-up of a move, the faster that move will be. In contrast, the higher the start-up of a move, the slower it will be.

Let’s compare this to Jade’s F2, which has a start-up of 28 frames. This move will come out a lot slower than Jade’s B2.

Active

Active frames are the amount of frames a move has while it is active.

Jade’s B2 has 21 active frames. This move will stay active for quite a while compared to Jade’s F2 which only has 2 active frames.

Recovery

Recovery frames are the amount of frames a move has after being used for a character to be able to move again.

Jade’s F2 has 34 recovery frames. This means that after Jade has used this move, she can no longer block or move until 34 frames have passed. Moves with a high amount of recovery frames are generally unsafe if they miss.

Hit Advantage

Hit Advantage is the amount of frames a move gives after it hits.

Jade’s B2 has 15 hit advantage. If the opponent is hit by this move, they won’t be able to move for 15 frames.

Block Advantage

Block Advantage is the amount of frames a move gives after it is blocked.

Jade’s B3434 has 5 block advantage. If the opponent blocks this move, they won’t be able to move for 5 frames.

Most moves however will have negative block advantage. A move that has negative block advantage works in the opposite manner. Jade’s B2 has -13 block advantage. If the opponent blocks this move, then instead, Jade won’t be able to move for 13 frames.

Moves with a high amount of negative block advantage are generally unsafe. For example, in order to punish Jade’s B2, the opponent will need to use a move with 12 start-up frames or faster.

A move with 13 start-up frames will not work here because the move doesn’t become active until the 14th frame, which is the first active frame.

Another thing to note is if a Special Move with 13 start-up frames is done as a reversal, then it will work because reversals have 1 frame shaven off.

Flawless Block Advantage

Flawless Block Advantage is the amount of frames a move gives after it is Flawless Blocked.

Jade’s F2 has -19 Flawless Block advantage. If the opponent Flawless Blocks this move, Jade won’t be able to move for 19 frames.

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MarlowRaptorChrisXxxHushxxX Recent comment authors
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Marlow
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Marlow

How does Cancel Advantage work?

Chris
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Chris

Hey I am a blind player, and I am impressed with the level of accessibility for screen reader users this site has. THanks sooo much. It was difficult to find a site that was accessible.

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Wow, this is the best explanation of frame data I’ve seen yet. I only really understood what start up is and that’s it and that if my move has a startup number lower than my opponent, I’ll be able to hit my opponent first if we throw a move at the same time, but I’m actually understanding this alot more. Ever consider doing a video it this? I’m sure it would be even better if you use examples. Just a suggestion. Thanks for this